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Infographic: The Affordable Care Act - Addressing the unique health needs of women (text)

Infographic: Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act — Addressing the unique health needs of women.

The health care law makes it easier for women to access and pay for health care, helping them and their families stay healthy.

More than 6 in 10 women ages 40 and older had a mammogram within the past two years. The law requires coverage of many preventive services for women, including mammograms, at no cost to women.[1]

Nearly 77 percent of women start breastfeeding after giving birth. Only 16 percent still exclusively breastfeed at 6 months. The law requires coverage of breastfeeding support and equipment to make going back to work easier for breastfeeding moms.[2]

An estimated 19.7 million women are smokers, which puts them at risk for several types of cancer and heart disease. The law requires coverage, at no cost, for services to help women quit smoking.[3]

More than 4 in 10 women ages 15–44 use some form of contraception. The law requires coverage of FDA-approved birth control at no cost to women.[4]

Nearly 135 million women have received a routine exam in the past two years, many having to pay out-of-pocket. The law requires coverage of well-woman visits at no cost to women.[5]

The health care law protects women. Women cannot be denied coverage due to a pre-existing condition. Women can choose any primary care provider or OB-GYN in their health plan’s network. Women cannot be charged more than men for the same health coverage. Women’s health coverage must include pregnancy and newborn care.

The health care law gives women more choices, more control, and better health. An important part of the law is the new Health Insurance Marketplace. Starting October 1, Americans, including 18.6 million women who are uninsured, will be able to find insurance that fits their needs—all in one place.[6]

Learn more about the law at HHS.gov/HealthCare.

Get ready for the Health Insurance Marketplace at HealthCare.gov.

Sources

  1. 2010 Data Release
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2012
  2. Breastfeeding Report Card — United States, 2012
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2012
  3. Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2011
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2012
  4. Current Contraceptive Use in the United States, 2006–2010, and Changes in Patterns of Use Since 1995
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2012
  5. BRFSS 2011 Survey Data and Documentation
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2013
  6. Census data to target the uninsured
    Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), 2013

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Content last updated August 07, 2013.

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